© 2020 Christianity.com. as a butt to shoot thine arrows at, one affliction after another, thick and fast, see Job 16:12 Lamentations 3:12; the words I think may be rendered, "why hast thou appointed me to meet thee", or "for a meeting with thee?" The illustrations of the book, says von Gerlach correctly, are chiefly Egyptian. Have I become a burden to you? Have I become a burden to you? (c) , Sept. "et tibi", Beza, Grotius. He says that God had made him the special object of his displeasure, and that his condition was insupportable. It will not mar thy happiness, affect thy peace, or in any way injure a being so great as God. & Ar. NIV®. So it is understood by Schultens, Rosenmuller, Dr. Good, Noyes, Herder, Kennicott, and others. Foeder. Job 7:20 "I have sinned; what shall I do unto thee, O thou preserver of men? He was a prayerful man, who kept his seven sons and three daughters covered by prayer, appealing to the Lord for their spiritual well-being. ), as e.g., מרמס, Isaiah 10:6 (Ewald, 160, c). job 7:0.

18And that thou shouldest visit him every morning, and try him every moment? Vid. 8:28, NIV). Job 7:20, ESV: "If I sin, what do I do to you, you watcher of mankind?Why have you made me your mark? 20I have sinned; what shall I do unto thee, O thou preserver of men? as a butt to shoot thine arrows at, one affliction after another, thick and fast, see Job 16:12 Lamentations 3:12; the words I think may be rendered, "why hast thou appointed me to meet thee", or "for a meeting with thee?" Read verse in New International Version In Job 7:13, ב after נשׂא is partitive, as Numbers 11:17; Mercier correctly: non nihil querelam meam levabit. Job 9:29-31 If I be wicked, why then labour I in vain? Article Images Copyright © 2020 Getty Images unless otherwise indicated.

Why have I become a burden to you?" bahr). F2 as one man challenge, another to meet him in such a place and fight him: alas! 30. That there is much in this language which is irreverent and improper no one can doubt, and it is not possible wholly to vindicate it. Hideous dreams often disturb the sleep of those suffering with elephantiasis, says Avicenna (in Stickel, S. 170). I am not equal to thee, I am a mere worm, not able to contend with thee the mighty God, or to meet thee in the way of thy judgments, and to endure the heavy strokes of thy angry hand; and so Bar Tzemach paraphrases it. Then he desires death; he wishes that his difficulty of breathing would increase to suffocation, the usual end of elephantiasis.

(n) After all temptations faith steps forth and leads Job to repentance: yet it was not in such perfection that he could bridle himself from reasoning with God, because he still tried his faith.

(x) "quid faciam aut facere possum tibi", Michaelis; "debeam", Schmidt. Job was a spiritual man who trusted God. A few manuscripts of the Masoretic Text, an ancient Hebrew scribal tradition and Septuagint; most manuscripts of the Masoretic Text "I have become a burden to myself. (a) "Sospitatur", Codurcus; "servator", Drusius, Schmidt, Michaelis. The Nile is also called ים in Isaiah 19:5, and in Homer ὠκεανός, Egyptian oham ( equals ὠκεανός), and is even now called (at least by the Bedouins) bahhr (Arab. 7:20, TEV; Rom. The reading which we follow, and is followed by the Targum, and by most interpreters, Jewish and Christian, is a correction of the scribes, and one of the eighteen places corrected by them; which is no argument of the corruption of the Hebrew text, but of the contrary; since this was only placed in the margin of the Bible, as the Masorites afterwards did with their various readings, showing only what was their sense of this, and the like passages; and as an instruction how in their opinion to understand them, still retaining the other reading or writing; and which, according to Aben Ezra, may be rightly interpreted, and is, "so that I am a burden to thee" (c); and which is followed by some, signifying, as Job thought at least, that he was so offensive to him that he could not bear him, but treated him as an enemy; was weary of him, as God is said to be of sinners and their sins, and of the services and duties of carnal professors, see Isaiah 1:14; so Abendana interprets it,"thou hast set me for a mark unto thee, as if I was a burden to thee.''. thou art all over match for me, I cannot struggle and contend with thee, a sinful man with an holy God: O thou preserver of men? הבל, like רוּח, Job 7:7. Since a watch on the sea can only be designed to effect the necessary precautions at its coming forth from the shores, it is probable that the poet had the Nile in mind when he used ים, and consequently the crocodile by תּנּין. Job 7:20 NIV Job 7:20 NLT Job 7:20 ESV Job 7:20 NASB Job 7:20 KJV Job 7:20 Bible Apps Job 7:20 Biblia Paralela Job 7:20 Chinese Bible Job 7:20 French Bible Job 7:20 German Bible Alphabetical: a am as become burden done have I If made me men myself … Bob Marcaurelle Job. He expostulates with God concerning his afflictions, Job 7:7-12; describes the disturbed state of his mind by visions in the night season; abhors life, Job 7:13-16; and, showing that he is unworthy of the notice of God, begs pardon and respite, Job …

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