It breeds in woodland and scrub in northern Europe and across the Palearctic. By using our site you consent to the use of cookies. Registered Charity Number 216652 (England & Wales), SC039193 (Scotland), © British Trust for Ornithology, BTO, The Nunnery, Thetford, Norfolk IP24 2PU, Tel: +44 (0)1842 750050 Fax: +44 (0)1842 750030. The fieldfare (Turdus pilaris) is a member of the thrush family Turdidae. It is strongly migratory, with many northern birds moving south during the winter. The recovery map of BTO-ringed Fieldfares includes birds recovered as far east as Turkey. Status: Winter visitor, rare breeder. Very small numbers have continued nesting fairly regularly in Scotland and the Peak District. From ringing recoveries, we see that some birds return annually to the same local orchards whilst others may wander in completely different directions in two consecutive autumns. The BTO Conference 2020 will be virtual. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Much like Mistle Thrushes, they will defend winter food sources, like apples and berries. Out of these cookies, the cookies that are categorized as necessary are stored on your browser as they are essential for the working of basic functionalities of the website. They are conspicuous thrushes with very sociable habits which form large noisy flocks. They may venture into gardens during the winter when snow covers the ground. Breeding was confirmed in just four 10-km squares, in the Cairngorms, Shetland, Scottish Borders and Peak District. BTO's Head and Principal Ecologist, Gavin Siriwardena, explains how the urban landscape is affecting our wild bird populations. BTO doesn't currently contact supporters by telephone for promotional reasons. BTO occasionally contacts supporters who have expressed an interest in volunteering for surveys, or have volunteered in the past, to promote participation in other surveys. These cookies do not store any personal information. But opting out of some of these cookies may have an effect on your browsing experience. There are even reports of birds ramming Magpies and Jays in flight! As will be seen in the Atlas, “ Fieldfares are clearly very rare breeders with just a handful of 10-km squares showing evidence of breeding, mostly in Scotland and northern England. Find out more about Fieldfares on BirdFacts and the Wider Countryside Report. These arrivals are later in years with good berry crops in Scandinavia. The head is grey, as is the rump, which contrasts with the black tail and the rich chestnut-red back and wings, the latter with much black in the longer flight feathers. Within these islands, as the winter abundance map alongside shows, “there is a preference for low-lying land in southeast and central England”. It is a very rare breeder in the British Isles, but winters in large numbers in the United Kingdom, Southern Europe, North Africa and the Middle East. Breeding was confirmed in just four 10-km squares, in the Cairngorms, Shetland, Scottish Borders and Peak District. These cookies will be stored in your browser only with your consent. Females incubate the eggs for 11-14 days and the young fledge the nest at 12-16 days. Join us for a series of talks and panels. In the 1990s it looked as if the westward expansion of breeding Fieldfares may reach Britain, but this no longer seems likely. The BTO Conference 2020 will be virtual. Read our full Privacy Policy and Website Terms and Conditions of use. Breeding birds: 1 – 2 pairs. How to identify The fieldfare has a chestnut-brown back and yellowy breast, streaked with black.
We are delighted that this year’s Witherby Memorial lecture will be presented by Prof. Caren Cooper. Join us for a series of talks and panels. This slow drop in occurrence rate may show that birds are disappearing from western lists, as flocks move towards the east, but we will learn more through the current Winter Thrushes Survey. In late winter grass fields, playing fields and arable fields with nearby trees and hedges are a favourite place. Fieldfares are large thrushes. Some observers are sure that there are actually ‘guard’ Fieldfares which will escort potential predators away from the colony. BTO doesn't currently contact supporters by text message for promotional reasons. Fieldfares’ diets consist of worms, snails and insects. Fieldfares begin to arrive in the UK in October and they begin to return from March.

To some extent the autumn movements of flocks are resource-determined, leading to significant variability in the numbers reaching Britain & Ireland. This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website. Wintering birds: 720,000. Using data from Timed Tetrad Visits, we can model the winter abundance of Fieldfare, with darker blue indicating higher densities (left). It would be interesting to look at the Atlas maps, perhaps alongside the Winter Thrushes Survey data, to see how much association there is between orchards and the species’ distribution. BTO currently promotes two appeals a year, and occasionally offers membership opportunities to non-members. This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions. Breeding distribution of Fieldfare during the breeding seasons 2008 to 2011 (left). The Fieldfare is specially protected as it is such a rare breeding bird in Britain. In some areas, such as the southwest counties of the Midlands, four-figure flocks can be seen descending upon orchards, to feed on apples that were not picked in the autumn. In bad years, as many as a million Fieldfares may have no alternative but to head over the sea to the British Isles in the hope of finding winter sustenance. Weight: 80 – 120 g. Description.

In the cold spring of 2013, larger numbers of birds stayed with us until mid-April, followed by a rapid departure as the weather improved. The chest and flanks are heavily speckled with dark spots. The Fieldfare's diet is composed of insects and berries. We will send you a monthly email newsletter including information on our latest research, projects to participate in, fundraising opportunities, events and interesting facts about birds. “The winter distribution map shows a 4% range expansion since the 1981–84 Winter Atlas, with gains confined mainly to the Scottish Highlands, Hebridean islands and the west of Ireland. There are even reports of birds ramming Magpies and Jays in flight! You can unsubscribe at any time. BTO occasionally contacts supporters who have expressed an interest in volunteering for surveys, or have volunteered in the past, to promote participation in other surveys. The most often heard call note is a harsh, aggressive sounding ‘chack-chack’. You also have the option to opt-out of these cookies. We hope that the Winter Thrushes Survey will help to explain how the species’ distribution over the course of the winter is linked to food availability. Fieldfares are large thrushes. This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions. Hawthorn hedges with berries are a favourite feeding area. Although some of this increase is likely to be due to improved coverage in these marginal areas, the two severe winters of 2009/10 and 2010/11 may have forced greater numbers of Fennoscandian immigrants into western parts of Britain and Ireland”.

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